"One stop shopping for all your needs"

Convenient enough to zip in and out for a bottle of wine or just stay for a day of beauty, shopping and dining on any one of our beautiful patios providing a great view of the Hublein Tower.

We hope to see you soon!



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In the 1600's Riverdale Farms was the Case farm. The Holloway family purchased the 124.5 acre farm from Aaron Levitansky in 1921. They started to improve both soil and building conditions and with the purchase of surrounding land, Riverdale Farms grew to over 600 acres.

In 1932, the Holloway's started the retail milk business which at its peak, had 200 head of cattle. The Honiss Oyster House, a well-known restaurant in Hartford, was their first commercial customer.
The 1870's Fred Neville house, which once housed the one-room Avon Library, was purchased from the Town of Avon in 1947 and moved to Riverdale Farms so the Towpath Elementary School could be built.

The expense of changing the dairy equipment to handle homogenizing and pasteurizing of milk in the mid 1950's, caused the Holloways to sell the dairy business to Brock Hall and leasing the farm for one year. They then went into the gravel and loam business, conducted on their property beyond the railroad underpass, which was later sold to the State of Connecticut for wildlife preservation, as it is today.

Other pieces of the farm continued to be sold and in August, 1977 Silvio and Theresa Brighenti purchased the remaining 26 acres of Riverdale Farms which included all the buildings - the main farmhouse and dairy barn, the head herdsman's house, creamery, grain shed and blacksmith shop, coal storage bin, calf barn, carriage/wagon shed, hired hands apartments, the Raymond and Hazel Holloway house and the Avon railroad depot, together with pieces of farm equipment used on the farm. To begin restoration and conversion of the farm, all utilities were put undergound which took three years to complete and the first business opened in 1980.

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Silvio and Theresa Brighenti saw the potential the dairy farm had, decided to keep the name Riverdale Farms, and so began to restore a very special and important part of Avon.
Located on Route 10 North, the area in the late 1800's and early 1900's had sawmills, farms and a box shop.

In 1921 Frank S. Holloway bought Riverdale Farms which consisted of 124.5 acres, an 1830 old frame colonial dwelling house, a horse, cow and hay barn, delapitated cider mill and a small chicken coop. Frank's mother, his brother Raymond with his wife, Hazel and their children moved to and lived at Riverdale Farms for over 50 years.

The Holloways were buying and selling cattle then and started to improve both soil and building conditions. In 1932 they started a retail milk business from scratch, delivering milk to their first customer in Hartford, The Honiss Oyster restaurant, by using four horses and a sleigh when heavy snow blocked roads. The Canal Line Railroad was built through Avon in 1848. The railroad station, The Avon Depot, had both freight and express office with telegraph instruments installed in 1884. The depot was bought by the Holloways for $1.00 and moved to Riverdale Farms to be used as their office, where it still stands and in use for one of the shops.

Due to damage caused by the 1955 flood along with expense of changing their dairy equipment to handle homogenization, the Holloways sold the dairy business to Brock Hall, leasing the farm for one year and selling their cows at auction. Some land was sold to the state for wildlife preservation as it is today, adjoin-ing Riverdale Farms. The remaining 26 acres which included all the buildings, were bought in 1977 by Silvio and Theresa Brighenti of Avon.

Books, magazines and periodicals on restoration of barns became everyday reading for Silvio. Barns were not intended to be adapted for human use but we have successfully converted these barns into commercial structures, giving them a new useful purpose. Each building is unique in its design, the external appearance giving only a hint of what can be found inside. The restored buildings at Riverdale Farms with specialty shops, restaurant and services, are named as they were used when it was a working dairy farm. In full view of the Heublein Tower and ever changing Talcott Mountain, Riverdale Farms continues to grow with added new buildings and shops. Keeping the natural land contours, planting grass, trees and flowers instead of paving with asphalt, and constructing brick walkways with split-rail fences,

Riverdale Farms is what shopping centers ought to be - we call it "Shopping the way it used to be".


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